A light for a loved one and to save a life

Rotary Club of Sowerby Bridge Tree of Light and defibrilator project at tre tree in The Village restaurant car park. From the left, The Village co-owner Raja Ifzal, Ken Forsyth, Hazel Brindle president Barry Small, Shabir Hussain, Alan Tatham, Paul Brindle and Peter Sutcliffe.
Rotary Club of Sowerby Bridge Tree of Light and defibrilator project at tre tree in The Village restaurant car park. From the left, The Village co-owner Raja Ifzal, Ken Forsyth, Hazel Brindle president Barry Small, Shabir Hussain, Alan Tatham, Paul Brindle and Peter Sutcliffe.

A colourful tree will light up Sowerby Bridge centre in memory of loved ones in a Christmas campaign to fund life-saving equipment for the centre.

The Tree of Lights and Defibrillator Project has been organised by the town’s Rotary Club to bring meaningful reflection to the minds of onlookers at the same time as raising money for a town centre defibrillator for use by local residents and Sowerby Bridge visitors.

For the first year running, the coloured lights on the ash tree, in the Village Restaurant carpark, Wharf Street, will be switched on by the Mayor of Calderdale, Pat Allen, on November 14, at 6pm.

The lights will remain switched on until January 6, 2015.

The Rotary is asking people to purchase a bulb for a minimum £5 donation. Donating individuals are invited to complete a dedication form with a message of love which will be recorded online in the Club’s Book of Remembrance and on display at Sowerby Bridge Library.

Organised by Rotarians Hazel Brindle and president Barry Small, it is hoped the Tree of Lights will bring joy and comfort to all those who have lost a loved one, said Mr Small.

The project aims to raise £2,000 for a public defibrillator in the event of a person suffering a cardiac arrest.

“We’re really hoping the public and business community of Sowerby Bridge get behind this campaign to install life-saving equipment on the main throughfare of the town,” said Hazel.

The Club is working with Yorkshire Ambulance Service’s community defibrillation officer Emma Stott to source and secure a defibrillator.Many cardiac arrest victims’ lives could be saved through fast response time to ventricular fibrillation. Seconds count and access to a defibrillator really does mean life or death, said Emma.

Rotary is working with Yorkshire Ambulance Service to locate an easily accessible town centre location.

The community public access defibrillator, which sends an electrical shock to the heart, can be accessed 24/7 by anyone in the vacinity called upon to resuscitate a cardiac arrest victim.

Public access defibrillators can be used by anyone and are stored in a weather proof casing. The have keycode lock to prevent them being subject to vandalism. To access the equipment, the user must place a call to 999 where an operator will then tell them the code and the defibrillator then instructs the user how to use on the patient. The machine costs about £3 per year to run.

Donation forms can be obtained online at rotary.sowerbybridge and from participating Sowerby Bridge outlets:

Deli Belge; Village Restaurant; Trinkette Gift Shop. Completed dedication forms can be handed in to participating retailers or posted to Rotary Club of Sowerby Bridge, c/o Sportsmans Inn, Rochdale Road, Greetland, Halifax, HX4 8PL.