Back to the good old days of British telly

Marie Lister, Deborah Ward and Maureen Cook entertain residebts at Trinity Fold, Halifax, with a recreation of the 1960's TV show Take Your Pick.
Marie Lister, Deborah Ward and Maureen Cook entertain residebts at Trinity Fold, Halifax, with a recreation of the 1960's TV show Take Your Pick.
0
Have your say

RESIDENTS at a Halifax care home turned back the clock for a version of the 1960s TV quiz Take Your Pick.

Staff at Trinity Fold Care Home, Blackwall, organised a trip down memory lane to host the popular game show for residents.

They donned 1960s outfits to bring to life the show, originally hosted on ITV by Michael Miles.

It was later relaunched in the 1990s by Des O’Connor.

The first part of the residents’ fun came with the show’s Yes-No Interlude, in which contestants face quick-fire questions and must not reply with a Yes, No or shake or nod of the head.

In the TV show, Bob Danvers Walker was on hand with a dinner gong and he would “bong” the contestants out if they uttered the forbidden words.

Danvers Walker was a noted radio announcer and for years was the “stiff-upper-lip” voice hehind the Pathe newsreels.

Gill Sherwood, Trinity Fold’s activity co-ordinator, said that part of the game was “a lot of fun”.

She said: “On uttering these forbidden words, the gong master sounded the gong and that contestant was out.”

Winners then chose prizes from two mystery boxes – one of which contained a booby prize.

Contestant Sheila Robinson, 71, who has lived at Trinity Fold for four years, said: “There are always lots of interesting and fun activities organised here by the staff who are really friendly.”

Fellow contestant Edith Scotford, 92, said it was her first game show.

She said: “I enjoy living here because there are lots of things to do with my friends.

“I particularly like the cake decorating sessions.”

Take Your Pick was originally broadcast by Radio Luxembourg in the early 1950s.

It transferred to television in 1955 with the launch of ITV and was hosted by Michael Miles until 1968.

Des O’Connor hosted the programme’s revival from 1992 to 1998.

After the initial “yes-no” round, contestants would answer questions to win small cash prizes.

In the climax of the show, contestants had to decide whether to take the money or open the box, which could mean big holidays prizes or a bag of sweets.

l What’s your favourite TV quiz show – and why? E-mail yoursay@halifaxcourier.co.uk