Apprenticeships are future for youngsters

Calderdale College student, Emma Ramsdin, spent the day shadowing Craig Whittaker as part of National Apprenticeship Week 2012.
Calderdale College student, Emma Ramsdin, spent the day shadowing Craig Whittaker as part of National Apprenticeship Week 2012.
0
Have your say

Businesses across Calderdale have been celebrating new starters as part of National Apprenticeship Week 2012.

Calderdale College led the way with many of its students getting hands-on experience in workplaces.

Business administration student, Emma Ramsdin, 18, spent a day shadowing Calder Valley MP, Craig Whittaker.

She got the chance to go behind the scenes in the constituency office and got to see the filming of the BBC’s Sunday Politics Show which Mr Whittaker was appearing on.

Miss Ramsdin said: “I was interested to see how the MP’s office worked and looking at the similarities and differences in working to my own job.”

Mr Whittaker said: “I am happy to support the work of local apprentices and the work they do throughout the year. National Apprenticeship week is an opportunity to highlight the benefits of working as an apprentice and gaining recognised qualifications at the same time.”

The week long scheme, from February 6 to 10, wasn’t just for the younger generation.

Calderdale College training officer Annette Levy went back to the floor at the Ark Nursery, Mytholmroyd.

Mrs Levy leads the college’s courses in childcare and work with young people but spent the day at the nursery to get the viewpoint of childcare apprentice.

She said: “I have an appreciation of my apprentices and how hard the work is to engage and stimulate children.

“The job is very similar to when I started, it is very interactive, supporting and playing with the children.”

Meanwhile Calderdale College student Simon Cutts is a prime example of the benefits of apprenticeships.

The 18-year-old worked as an apprentice with the college’s admin team as part of his customer service qualification and has now bagged himself a full time job at the college’s new Inspire Centre.

Simon said: “I have gained much more confidence and independence than before I started and feel I have become a different person.”

But the best example has to be Nestle factory worker Philip Ashton who started as an apprentice in 1971 and has worked his way up to being a project manager.

“Over 40 years I have held nine different roles without having to change company or venture out of the Halifax factory, with each role providing its own unique challenges,” he said.

“Although I chose to concentrate my career at the Halifax site the opportunities that exist are amazing even for anyone wishing to start on the bottom rung as an apprentice.”