Former Brighouse Royal Engineer jailed for violent attacks on partner in Brighouse

Christopher Nunns was jailed for carrying out an assault in Brighouse
Christopher Nunns was jailed for carrying out an assault in Brighouse
0
Have your say

A former Royal Engineer who served in the Falklands and Bosnia has been sentenced to two years in prison for two attacks on his partner last year.

In a victim impact statement read to Bradford Crown Court today (Tuesday) Karen Bartle said her relationship with 42-year-old Christopher Nunns had devastated her life and she didn’t want any further contact with him.

Nunns, formerly of Edward Street, Waring Green, Brighouse, pulled his partner backwards down the stairs following a row at their home last July.

As a result of that assault the complainant was left with a bloodied face and swelling to her left cheek and left eye.

Prosecutor Jeremy Hill-Baker said Nunns, who had no previous convictions for violence, was given police bail and the couple reconciled.

But four months later Nunns “flipped” during another attack fuelled by alcohol and strong medication.

He tried to get his partner to stab him, but when she refused Nunns cut his own face with a Stanley knife and said he was going to blame her for the injuries.

The court heard that Nunns then banged his partner’s head against a wall and hit her over the head with a bottle.

The complainant said she was knocked unconscious and the court heard that she sustained cuts to her head and bruising to her body.

Nunns pleaded guilty to offences of assault and unlawful wounding and today Judge Mark Savill also imposed an indefinite restraining order which bans the defendant from contacting his former partner.

Nunns was sentenced over a video link to Leeds prison where he has been on remand for the last four months and in an address to the court he expressed his regret and sorrow for the violence towards the complainant.

Barrister Charles Blatchford, for Nunns, said the defendant was now getting help with the difficulties he had struggled with since leaving the military.

“He was serving in Bosnia at the time when the worst atrocities were taking place and he was exposed to some of the most horrific things in the Bosnian conflict,” said Mr Blatchford.

Mr Blatchford said his client accepted that what he did was wrong and he believed that the medication he had taken affected his mood and recollection at the time of the second attack.

Judge Savill said the injuries suffered by the complainant were not trifling and one of the attacks had involved the use of a weapon.

He warned Nunns that he would face further trouble if he contacted his victim in the future.

“Your relationship with her has devastated her life and she is suffering from its on-going effects,” noted Judge Savill.