DCSIMG

Protestor has his conviction overturned

A train carrying over 1000 tonnes of coal, halted over a bridge on it's way to Drax power station near Selby, West Yorkshire, UK.
Activists who stopped the train with a red flag, then climbed on top and proceeded to shovel coal onto the tracks. They protest against the Drax's continuing role as the largest signle polluter in the UK and producer of over twenty (20) million tonnes of CO2 every year.
The 35 protestors planned to stay in occupation of the train.
� Nick Cobbing
13 June 2008
07973 642 103
nick@nickcobbing.co.uk

A train carrying over 1000 tonnes of coal, halted over a bridge on it's way to Drax power station near Selby, West Yorkshire, UK. Activists who stopped the train with a red flag, then climbed on top and proceeded to shovel coal onto the tracks. They protest against the Drax's continuing role as the largest signle polluter in the UK and producer of over twenty (20) million tonnes of CO2 every year. The 35 protestors planned to stay in occupation of the train. � Nick Cobbing 13 June 2008 07973 642 103 nick@nickcobbing.co.uk

An environmental campaigner who has had his conviction resulting from a high profile protest quashed has called for an independent inquiry into how the police handle undercover investigations.

Paul Morrozzo, 47, of Hebden Bridge, was one of 29 environmental campaigners convicted of offences after they ambushed a freight train as it took fuel to Drax, the largest coal-fired power station in Europe.

Participants in the non-violent protest were sentenced at Leeds Crown Court in 2009 and 2010 for obstructing the railway.

They were charged with obstructing engines or carriages on railways, which is an offence under the Malicious Damage Act 1861.

The convictions were quashed because of the failure to disclose the fact that Mark ‘’Flash’’ Stone - a van driver in the protest - had been working as an undercover policeman.

Speaking after the Court of Appeal hearing in London, Mr Morrozzo, who served 150 hours’ community service as a result of the conviction, said: “The quashing of this conviction is not a massive deal for me personally, but it’s an extremely important movement in the broader campaign to expose police corruption.”

 
 
 

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