The farm from 200 years ago can now be rebuilt

David Collinge at Work House Farm, Colden with Higher Heath and Lower Heath in the backgound.
David Collinge at Work House Farm, Colden with Higher Heath and Lower Heath in the backgound.
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PLANNERS have finally given farmer David Collinge permission to restore a farm in one of the most isolated and picturesque areas of Calderdale.

It was third time lucky for Mr Collinge who was previously told the track to what remains of Higher Heath was inadequate for motor transport.

The ruin stands at the head of the Colden valley and can been seen against the skyline from Work House Farm, where Mr Collinge has lived for more than 40 years.

A planning appeal was rejected because it was thought the development would “adversely affect” the Special Landscape Area.

Higher Heath was a self-contained farm in the early 1900s when a substantial extension was added to one end.

Over the years, the old house and barn have lost their roof and floors but the addition remains watertight.

For that reason Mr Collinge said he believed it was worth saving.

“All I want to do is bring back into use something that has stood in this valley for more than 200 years.”

He has been granted planning approval this time around because he has managed to come up with a way of entering the site from the south, rather than the north.

The farm is within a few hundred yards of the South Pennine Moors Special Protection Area, a Special Area of Conservation and a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

Among its nearest neighbours are the enigmatically named Egypt, Greenland and Scotland farms.