Charity urges people to look after heart health

Undated Handout Photo of Vinnie Jones, who is supporting the British Heart Foundation's Hands-only CPR campaign. See PA Feature HEALTH Resuscitation. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/BHF. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature HEALTH Resuscitation.
Undated Handout Photo of Vinnie Jones, who is supporting the British Heart Foundation's Hands-only CPR campaign. See PA Feature HEALTH Resuscitation. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/BHF. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature HEALTH Resuscitation.

CHARITY chiefs say hundreds of families in Calderdale face losing a loved one this year from heart disease.

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has published figures which show an average of 266 people died each year in Calderdale from the condition.

The figures coincide with the start of BHF’s National Heart Month, which urges people to go Red for Heart and join in national Wear it Red day on Friday February 24 to boost the charity’s funds.

National Heart Month comes on the back of the BHF’s potentially life-saving plea for people to use hands-only CPR to save lives, which was backed by Hollywood hardman Vinnie Jones.

Vinnie’s wife Tanya had a heart transplant nearly 25 years ago and he joined the charity in urging people to use heart massage - to the beat of the Bee Gees’ Stayin’ Alive track. The campaign urges people to forget the kiss of life and concentrate on the chest compressions - which is more effective for untrained bystanders than trying the often ineffective kiss of life.

Figures from West Yorkshire also showed an average of 582 people die in Kirklees each year from heart disease and 672 in Bradford.

Leeds had the highest figures, of an average of 1,011 people.

Sue Green, BHF fundraising and volunteer manager in West Yorkshire, said: “The figures published in our Coronary Heart Disease Statistics 2012 give a snapshot of the state of the nation’s heart health. These show that every year over 68,499 men and women in England lose their lives to heart disease, the country’s single biggest killer.

“Cardiovascular disease can affect anyone, young and old, perhaps a baby born with a hole in the heart or a friend or colleague who suffers a heart attack. Whether you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol we are working to ensure these conditions can one day be eliminated.

“There’s never been a better time to give a bit more thought to your own heart health – and that of the people you love – so get involved during National Heart Month by showing your red side.”

For more information visit bhf.org.uk/red.