Now I can hold her, hear her cry, get to know her

Anna Holdsworth has her premature baby girl, Terry, home from Doncaster hospital weighing just 4lb 6.'Whinney Hill Park, Brighouse

Anna Holdsworth has her premature baby girl, Terry, home from Doncaster hospital weighing just 4lb 6.'Whinney Hill Park, Brighouse

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BEAMING mum Anna Holdsworth is reunited with premature baby Terry at home after being separated by 44 miles.

She was born eight weeks early on September 18, weighing 3lb 9oz and shortly afterwards had to be transferred to Doncaster Royal Infirmary.

The lack of space at Calderdale Royal Hospital meant the Brighouse mum had a lengthy trip to see her newborn and had to take breast-milk in a bottle.

Terry was in Doncaster for nearly three weeks during which time Mrs Holdsworth, of Whinney Hill Park, made five trips.

A cot finally became available in Calderdale at the weekend and Terry was transferred on Saturday.

She was allowed home on Tuesday and now weighs 4lb 6oz.

Mrs Holdsworth said she was relieved to have her daughter home.

“I was ringing Doncaster four or five times a day and staff were quite happy to tell me how she was doing,” said Mrs Holdsworth, 30, who is also mum to Dylan, six, Adelaide, four, and Harry, two.

“Terry has been given a clean bill of health but has to see an eye specialist, which is routine for a premature baby.

“The difference now is I can hold her, hear her cry, and get to know her temperament and let people see her who couldn’t get over to Doncaster.”

Mrs Holdsworth said despite the difficulties she faced she was grateful for help given by staff in Doncaster and Calderdale.

She turned down the chance of a bed in Doncaster because she was torn between staying there and returning home to look after her other children.

“I don’t think most people realise what it means to be so far away from a new baby. I’m just glad she got back eventually,” she said.

A spokeswoman for Milk Matters –infant feeding and early parenting support specialists – said separating mum and baby by 44 miles was unwise.

“Extensive research has demonstrated skin contact stabilises a baby’s vitals such as oxygen saturation and body temperature, but even if we remove all the health aspects what is the psychological impact of a tiny baby not having physical contact with its mother?”