History society will put the past on view

Queensbury History Society preview of exhibition marking the 150th anniversary
Queensbury History Society preview of exhibition marking the 150th anniversary

Queensbury History Society will play a central role in celebrations to mark the 150th anniversary of the village name.

It will feature a photographic exhibition in the Victoria Hall from June 13 to 15.

In the 18th century the area was known as Queenshead before becoming Queensbury.

It was on the packhorse route between Halifax and Bradford and grew rapidly due to its textile links.

That started when John Foster built Black Dyke Mills in 1835.

Foster built many of the buildings in and around Queensbury for its employees and sponsored the Black Dyke Band which is still a world renowned brass band.

The Foster family once lived at the 30-acre Littlemoor Park in a 40-bedroomed mansion with a swimming pool in the basement and the history of that property, which is long since demolished, is included in the exhibition.

The history society was formed in 1985 and its team of seven volunteers led by archivist Sheila Thornton are putting on the exhibition - the first time for 25 years the full archives will be on public view.

She said it would chart buildings past and present and the history of schools, chapels, the band, Foster’s Mill and much more.

“We have had so many new homes built in the village there are many ‘off-comers’ who don’t know about the history,” she said.

Secretary Hazel Pearson said: “People should come and see what a great history we have and it’s worth preserving what we have left.”

From June 12 dozens of shops and businesses in the village will be putting up bunting to celebrate.

Ward Coun Lynda Cromie said it was great how the community had rallied round after the anniversary was mentioned at a meeting a few months ago.

“It’s absoutely phenomenal how people have pulled together at such short notice and it all snowballed from there,” she said.