Mum issues cat poisoning alert

Melissa Finnigan, with her children Kai and Tyler,  raising awarenes and dangers of cats being given anti freeze. Her two pets have recently died because of it.
Melissa Finnigan, with her children Kai and Tyler, raising awarenes and dangers of cats being given anti freeze. Her two pets have recently died because of it.

A Halifax mum is warning pet owners to be aware of the danger signs of anti freeze poisoning after her two cats died in the space of a week.

Melissa Finnigan, from Ovenden, has lost her pets Gizmo and Furby with vets suspecting they have consumed anti freeze.

“Both Gizmo and Furby were both fit and healthy and had no medical conditions. One morning we saw Furby wasn’t moving. The vets found Furby’s mouth full of ulcers and they said they thought it was anti freeze poisoning. It led to severe kidney failure.”

“Gizmo was also tested at the time but his bloods came back clear but the vet wanted to see him on a regular basis to check him.

“As the days progressed he became more lethargic and when he was moving he seemed to be in a lot of pain.”

“His symptoms took more time to show but he also suffered kidney failure and died.

“They were part of the family and all our neighbours loved them.”

The RSPCA give the advice that if a pet comes into contact with antifreeze and show any of these symptoms get them to a vet immediately: Vomiting, seeming depressed/sleepy, appearing drunk and uncoordinated, seizures (fits) and difficulty breathing.

A spokesperson said: ”The RSPCA and International Cat Care are deeply concerned and saddened about antifreeze poisonings in cats across Britain.

Antifreeze poisoning can cause pain, suffering, distress and ultimately, death. Poisoning cats can constitute a criminal offence; under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 the maximum penalty for anyone found guilty is up to six months imprisonment and/or a £20,000 fine.