New discovery for our star man

An artist's impression of the magnetar (on the left) and the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy (on the right).
An artist's impression of the magnetar (on the left) and the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy (on the right).
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A Halifax astronomer has made an out-of-this-world discovery after finding a rare type of star 27,000 light years away.

Ralph Eatough, 30, from Hebden Bridge, works at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany.

Ralph leads a team of scientists who have used the magnetar to measure properties of the black hole at the centre of the galaxy.

The discovery has been published in Nature, the most prestigious science journal on the planet.

He said: “NASA telescopes identifed the object but we were the first people to see the radio waves from it.

“People have been looking for this for a very long time because we can also use stars like these to test Einsteins theories so I was very excited when we found it.

“As the radio waves travel towards us we can learn about the material it’s travelling through.

“This has implications for how galaxies are formed and perhaps how many stars are formed in these galaxies.”