Still no signs for Blackpool, but lots of encouragement

Which way now? Just 10 minutes into the journey on day two and the walkers are already lost. Below: Breakfast provides the vital fuel for a long second day on the road

Which way now? Just 10 minutes into the journey on day two and the walkers are already lost. Below: Breakfast provides the vital fuel for a long second day on the road

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It’s day two of the fifth annual fund-raising walk in memory of teenager Naomi Gough and the walkers have made it into deepest Lancashire. Courier reporter Toby Higgins is with them on the 60-mile trek to Blackpool

It’s amazing how many people on the street ask what we’re doing and where we’re going.

Day two of the 2011 walk to Blackpool in memory of Naomi Gough. Courier reporter Toby Higgins is making the journey with them

Day two of the 2011 walk to Blackpool in memory of Naomi Gough. Courier reporter Toby Higgins is making the journey with them

You can even see people in cars slowing down and having a look at our bright yellow t-shirts and we quite often get horns beeped at us in support.

It’s only a small gesture but coming from people you don’t know after a very long day of walking just reminds you why you’re hobbling around the streets of Burnley looking for the first camp after the best part of 25 miles on the road.

That camp site was actually Lowerhouse Cricket Club, who, for no charge, kindly agreed to not only let us use their ground for free, but also let us use their kitchen (the pie and peas supper went down a storm) and kept the bar open for us long after the cricketers had left.

One man, who the Goughs had never met, even made a donation to SCARD of £100. It’s the kind of generosity so many people have shown not only on this trip, but over the previous four years too.

As we walk, mainly in small groups at our own pace, walkers ask eachother about how they know the Gough family and Naomi. Lots of people have different reasons for doing the walk – many are doing it for the third or fourth time, but the camaraderie among the group makes it great to be a part of.

As far as my feet are concerned – what a mess. I’ve got blisters all over them and to say I struggled yesterday is an understatement.

This morning hasn’t been much better either. Luckily the support vans mean I’ve been able to get cream and bandages to them, and when we arrive at camp our tents are up and waiting for us so I can just put my feet up and rest them.

This morning, after a delicious bacon and sausage sandwich and, thank goodness, a shower, we’ve walked along the canal from Burnley to Accrington in the pouring rain. We’ve got 14 miles to do today and we’re probably just over a third of the way there.

Next stop, Preston. The worrying thing is I’ve not seen a single road sign for Preston, let alone Blackpool...