Mr Taylor should read Hillsborough report - then apologise!

'worst day' Fans are lifted out of the lower tier of the Leppings Lane stand to escape the crush which killed 96 Liverpool fans at the 1989 FA Cup semi final
'worst day' Fans are lifted out of the lower tier of the Leppings Lane stand to escape the crush which killed 96 Liverpool fans at the 1989 FA Cup semi final
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This is my response to Roger Taylor’s horrible remarks and views about the HIlllsborough disaster.

It was the worst day of my life. The lies told afterwards that sought to blame the fans and deny the truth added a burden to my grief that I thought would never be shifted. The enquiry, finally after 23 years revealed the truth for everyone ot hear. That people like Roger Taylor can’t or won’t understand the truth is brings that burden back.

I was present on the leppings Lane terrace at Hillsborough on that day. Hillsborough is still a word that sends me back to that awful day when the combination of an unsafe stadium and police actions resulted in the deaths of 96 football supporters. I count myself lucky to have survived that day, so I more than most feel I have a right to respond to the horrible and offensive views Roger Taylor has chosen to express. Has he no understanding of grief? Can he not understand how terrible lies can hurt so much? There were two tragedies that came from Hillsborough, the disaster itself and then the actions of the police after the disaster which aimed to shift the blame entirely onto the supporters present on that day. The enquiry, which has taken 23 years of campaigning, has finally acknowledged the truth. I still feel a sense of confusion and betrayal about the actions of the South Yorkshire police on that day. I support the police. I trust them. I call on them when I need to. I can’t fathom what motivated their actions on that day and the days after. The enquiry has found that at least 41 people died as a direct consequence of the actions and inactions of the police on the day. Those actions were wrong. Those people did not need to die. I hope that the conscience of the guilty police officers continues to trouble them. Sir Norman Bettison can reflect on his role. He can decide on his future with honour and I’d encourage him to have the courage to do so. People can make awful mistakes and have to pay a heavy personal price for them. He at least has acknowledged the truth of the enquiry and apologised for some of his remarks. I wonder does Roger Taylor even have a conscience? I recommend he reads the report. He should then apologise.

Anthony Rutherford

Finkil St

Brighouse