Working wonders to bring wonderful fields back to former glory

Fred Chadwick marks out the football pitches at Stubb playing fields and, below, wild flowers  which are now visible after brambles were cleared by Fred's team of volunteers
Fred Chadwick marks out the football pitches at Stubb playing fields and, below, wild flowers which are now visible after brambles were cleared by Fred's team of volunteers
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As a frequent user of the breathtakingly beautiful Stubb playing fields in Mytholmroyd, I would just like to say a big “thank you” to Fred Chadwick and his team of volunteer helpers for their hard work and perseverance in bringing the neglected fields back to life.
As chairman of the Stubb Fields Community Association, he has worked tirelessly over the past two or three years to restore the field to its former glory. I came across him earlier this week marking out two football pitches for use by local football clubs - over and above the call of duty seeing as none of Fred’s own grandchildren live near enough to enjoy them. A big thank you also to Julian Rowntree who has given up many an hour to cut and maintain the grass which I am sure has been no easy task. 
Thanks to them there are now two much needed and long-awaited football pitches for our poor beleauguered youth teams who miss more matches than they play down at the permanently-flooded Brearley playing fields. The provision of dog waste bins has worked wonders - and the wildflowers now clearly visible following the removal of brambles round the edge of the field are a delight.
Of course it all centres around the magestic “Mary’s Tree”, which would no doubt have been matchsticks by now if it wasn’t for Steve Murty. So many thanks to him too.
Sorry if I’ve left anyone out but you have made one dog walker/football mum and no doubt dozens of local children very happy.

Sue Taylor

Wild flowers at Stubb playing fields in Mytholmroyd, now visible after brambles were cleared by a team of volunteers

Wild flowers at Stubb playing fields in Mytholmroyd, now visible after brambles were cleared by a team of volunteers