Trevor all shook up over sales of his latest book on Elvis’s influence on UK

Wonderland: Trevor's coversion is a shrine to the greats of rock and roll

Wonderland: Trevor's coversion is a shrine to the greats of rock and roll

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A moment snatched on a rainy school lunchtime fired a passion inside Trevor Simpson that still burns bright. You might even say it’s a burning love.

It happened while listening to a 78rpm vinyl recording of a man who would turn established popular music on its head.

Trevor Simpson, who has written a book, Elvis -The Best of British. Pictured in his studio at home in Ripponden.

Trevor Simpson, who has written a book, Elvis -The Best of British. Pictured in his studio at home in Ripponden.

It was the the 1950s at Sowerby Bridge Grammar School where Trevor listened astonished as Elvis belted out Heartbreak Hotel, his first hit.

Some time later he saved two weeks pocket money to buy it himself.

It started a love of music that has never died and Elvis, even though it is more than 35 years since he died, remains at the very heart of it.

Over the years, Trevor, a former top flight soccer referee and manager and business development manager of a building society, indulged his love of music as an avid collector, a DJ and by contributing music articles to magazines like Goldmine, Elvis The Man And His Music, the Dusty Springfield Bulletin and Essential Elvis, the Graceland approved bi-monthly magazine publication.

In 2007 he pooled his considerable knowledge of Sixties music in and around Halifax to create the wonderful Small Town Saturday Night which was warmly received and sold well.

A follow up confirmed his expertise as a music author.

But it is his latest project that has really caught the eye.

Trevor has just taken delivery of the finished product of five years research - a definitive book on the early years of Elvis Presley and his effect on the British music scene.

It is a huge tome, a must for true Elvis fans, and contains two CDs with every record released by HMV with a number of bonus tracks too.

His research threw up Halifax connections too. Trevor discovered while meeting with the widow of Don Lang, the Halifax musician who fronted the 6-5 Special and was at the forefront of rock ‘n’ roll here, Lang’s collaboration with a man named Walter Ridley who he composed records with and who launched Elvis in Britain on the HMV label.

HMV, which shared the same logo (Nipper the dog listening to a gramophone) as Elvis’s US label RCA, went on to release 13 of his singles, two EPs and three LPs.

The book Elvis: The Best of British - The HMV Years 1956 - 58 is already selling well all over the world. Elvis’s estate at Graceland took an initial pre-issue order of almost 1,000 copies.

“It’s taken some time to put together but it’s a true labour of love. Elvis really was the King of rock’n’ roll,” said Trevor.

Interestingly Elvis only ever came to Britain once and that was when he landed at Prestwick airport in 1960 on his way back from consciption in Germany.

Still his fan base remains as loyal here if not more loyal than anywhere else in the world according to Trevor.

Elvis : The Best of British is for sale at Fred Wade’s, Halifax or by logging onto the website elvisthebestofbritish.co.uk/

It is priced at £60.