Broadway meets Brighouse for a simple, enjoyable tale

Brighouse Theatre Productions Guys and Dolls. Pictured is Ed Hoyle 'Harry the Horse' Paul Tankard 'Big Jule'
Brighouse Theatre Productions Guys and Dolls. Pictured is Ed Hoyle 'Harry the Horse' Paul Tankard 'Big Jule'

Guys and Dolls

Brighouse Theatre Productions

Brighouse Theatre Productions Guys and Dolls. Pictured is Jennifer Normanton 'Agatha' Karon Higgins 'chorus' Deborah Granger and Maxine Emmenson ' Tourguide'

Brighouse Theatre Productions Guys and Dolls. Pictured is Jennifer Normanton 'Agatha' Karon Higgins 'chorus' Deborah Granger and Maxine Emmenson ' Tourguide'

Brighouse Civic Hall

This “music fable of Broadway”, with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and first performed 61 years ago, is a simple moral tale: men with serious gambling addictions, women with serious nesting addictions, compromised missionary zeal, all under the seedy bright lights of New York City in the 1950s.

The role of Sarah Brown, ably occupied by Christine Shoesmith, sits at the core of moral turpitude: clutching at the straws of right and dispelling the flailing temptations of wrong, Sarah Brown is in stark contrast to the feisty Miss Adelaide, a simple yet experienced show-girl, bawdily played and sung with great compulsion by the superb and beautifully accented Amy Roche.

With complex choreography on the tiny Civic Hall stage, commitment, accuracy and intimacy were essential and the cast came up trumps.

This was a light and frothy production from Brighouse Theatre Productions. It had a charming and energised immediacy of a world away, though thoroughly enjoyed here by audience and performers. This is an excellent effort by and for local people – also staged tonight (7.15pm) and tomorrow (2.15pm and 7.15pm).

Derek Greenwood