Keeping in spirit of things

Hebden Bridge Little Theatre's Blithe Spirit pictured by Bruce Cutts ''Steve Jamieson is seen surrounded by his two ghostly 'spirit' wives, played by Gilly Walker and Mori Noszkay

Hebden Bridge Little Theatre's Blithe Spirit pictured by Bruce Cutts ''Steve Jamieson is seen surrounded by his two ghostly 'spirit' wives, played by Gilly Walker and Mori Noszkay

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Little Theatre’s Summer production of Noel Coward’s timeless, hilarious comedy, ‘Blithe Spirit’ is in final rehearsals.’

This remains a cautionary tale against toying with the afterlife, for when author Charles Condemine employs the dotty medium and clairvoyant Madame Arcati to conduct a séance as part of research for his new book, she leaves behind Elvira, his mischievous first wife.

She proceeds to torment his second wife Ruth who can neither hear nor see her.

Director Steve Hirst has cast four new faces in the play-Steve Jamieson is the author Charles and is more usually well known and respected for roles in amateur operatic circles, his ghostly ex-wife is Moni Noszkay, and playing the eccentric Madame Arcati is Angela Clare.

Also making her debut with the company as Edith the maid is Paula Bland - Butterfield. Gilly Walker (Charles’ current wife Ruth) Vaughan Leslie and Heather McBride ( Dr and Mrs Bradman) are already well known to theatre audiences.

Steve says: “As evidence of its continuing ability to amuse and entertain it was recently revived to acclaim on the West End with Angela Lansbury as Madame Arcati.”’

The play runs from June 15-20 starting at 7.30pm with a matinee at 2.30am on the final Saturday. Tickets are available at Innovation or online at www.hblt.org.uk

lThe play was first seen in the West End in 1941, creating a new long-run record for non-musical British plays of 1,997 performances and did well on Broadway later that year. Coward adapted the play for film in 1945, starring Rex Harrison, and directed a musical adaptation, High Spirits, on Broadway in 1964. It was also adapted for television in the 1950s and 1960s and for radio. The play enjoyed several West End and Broadway revivals in the 1970s and 1980s and was revived again in London in 2004, 2011 and 2014.