Hebden Bridge Little Theatre look forward to 2021

After the disappointment of cancelling some of this year’s productions, Hebden Bridge Little Theatre is feeling optimistic for 2021 and cannot wait to return to the stage.

Thursday, 16th July 2020, 7:00 am
Hebden Bridge Little Theatre look forward to 2021.

After the disappointment of cancelling some of this year’s productions, Hebden Bridge Little Theatre is feeling optimistic for 2021 and cannot wait to return to the stage.

President Gilly Walker said: “Our first play this season went ahead as normal but since then we have sadly been completely shut down along with every other theatre in the country. We have moved the rest of the 2020 season in to 2021 with a slight re-arrangement.

“Hopefully we will re-open in the first week of March 2021 with ‘When We Are Married’ by JB Priestley.

“We are trying to be patient, whilst waiting to re-open, as we are all passionate about live theatre and are conscious of a gaping hole in our lives.

“We are champing at the bit to get back on the stage and will shortly be looking at ways we can perform outside or individually on stage in line with Government guidelines.”

The group has spent lockdown completing maintenance jobs, such as deep cleans, tidying the patio, installing a new canalside fence, resurfacing flats, organising and restructuring the wardrobe and preparing new display materials.

Earlier this month, the Government announced that it has created a £1.57bn fund to help the arts. However, details of who is eligible for support are still unclear. Fortunately the HBLT has not faced any drastic financial blows during the coronavirus crisis.

“As we are fortunate enough to own our building and therefore have no rent to find we are relatively secure financially for the time being,” Gilly said.

“The running costs of the building are obviously low as it is not being used by the general public. Calderdale Council has helped towards the running costs with a grant, for which we are most grateful.

“The Government’s announcement of £1.57 billion to shore up the arts is very welcome but as yet we have no indication that any of this will find its way into the amateur sector.”