`

Police seizing more Breaking Bad drug crystal meth in West Yorkshire

Police and army bomb disposal team at Westgate End in Wakefield last summer after chemicals and explosives were found in a flat.
Police and army bomb disposal team at Westgate End in Wakefield last summer after chemicals and explosives were found in a flat.

Police in West Yorkshire are seeing a rise the number of people caught with the Class A drug crystal meth.

An internal briefing circulated to officers highlighted a recent increase in the seizure of methylamphetamine, also known as crystal meth or ice.

We work tirelessly to tackle the impact of drugs in our communities.

Superintendent Derek Hughes

The highly addictive drug, which featured heavily in the hit TV show Breaking Bad, makes users feel alert and exhilarated but can also cause paranoia and long-term brain damage.

Superintendent Derek Hughes, of Leeds District, said: “Offences involving the use of methamphetamine remain low across the county, however, we have experienced a small increase in numbers this year.”

Data held by the force shows that a total of eight offences were recorded across the county between January and November this year, with six of those taking place during the final four months.

Numbers peaked in November when there were two recorded offences of producing crystal meth and one of possession with intent to supply.

A 42-year-old man was last week convicted of making Class A drugs and explosives at his home in Wakefield.

Vladmir Madle will be sentenced in February for 12 offences, including possessing crystal meth with intent to supply and making a Class A drug.

Following his arrest in June, officers searched his flat in Westgate End. They found an improvised explosive device and pyrotechnic fuses as well as small packages containing chemical compound potassium permanganate and aluminium powder together with traces of methylamphetamine.

Supt Hughes said: “We work tirelessly to tackle the impact of drugs in our communities and regularly undertake proactive operations. Central to this approach is strong community links and successful partnerships that work effectively together to target those involved.

“We continue to arm our officers with all the necessary knowledge to address the supply and possession of illegally held drugs and provide the necessary information to ensure their safety, particularly the effects of methamphetamine production and how to identify premises used to produce it.”