A group of volunteers are helping to unearthing the war-time secrets of a Calderdale wood.

Hidden trenches discovered in Halifax used by First World War heroes

Trodden three feet deep into the soil in a Calderdale wilderness, there are bootprints on a road to hell that the land never took back.

The soldiers of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment did their training in this part of Long Wood, Copley before they were sent to the Western Front.

A century later, protected rather than reclaimed by the woodland environment, their imprints remain as a tangible legacy of the First World War.
A century later, protected rather than reclaimed by the woodland environment, their imprints remain as a tangible legacy of the First World War.
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After three years and 500,000 of archaeological work, researchers hope they will survive for generations more.
After three years and 500,000 of archaeological work, researchers hope they will survive for generations more.
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Long Wood, near Copley on the outskirts of Halifax and the eastern fringe of the Pennines, was where the Army dug practice trenches for the first waves of troops destined for Europe
Long Wood, near Copley on the outskirts of Halifax and the eastern fringe of the Pennines, was where the Army dug practice trenches for the first waves of troops destined for Europe
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Forgotten for years, they have emerged, almost perfectly preserved and up to a metre deep in places, during a lottery-funded archaeological exploration of woods across the South Pennines.
Forgotten for years, they have emerged, almost perfectly preserved and up to a metre deep in places, during a lottery-funded archaeological exploration of woods across the South Pennines.
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