Youth project on course to monitor floods

CASH FLOW: Slow the Flow has been awarded a grant from the Community Foundation for Calderdale.
CASH FLOW: Slow the Flow has been awarded a grant from the Community Foundation for Calderdale.

A course for young people covering flood management has been organised for this month.

Slow the Flow Calderdale have been awarded a grant from the Community Foundation for Calderdale to operate a youth project which is focused around river level monitoring activities.

Flood work praised: Councillor Barry Collins.

Flood work praised: Councillor Barry Collins.

As a pilot to the project, Slow The Flow is holding a short course on river flooding and natural flood management which will also cover river level monitoring techniques.

The course is suitable for 15 to 19 year olds, those who are either currently studying or interested in studying geography, geology/earth science, environmental science or civil engineering at degree level, and for anyone else who is interested in this area of natural flood management.

The short course will take place over three days starting on Monday 18 June.

It will include some classroom work, a field trip along Colden Water followed by practical experience building leaky woody dams in Hardcastle Crags. A shorter briefing of the subject material may be arranged for Saturday 23 June for those unable to attend during the week.

The purpose of the field trip is to determine the best locations to install river level monitors.

Once the monitors are installed around the catchment area, these will join those already available for viewing by the general public in real time over the internet, available at: http://slowtheflow.net/elementor-1998/

Councillor Barry Collins, Calderdale Council’s cabinet member for regeneration and economic development, said: “This is a great opportunity for young people to learn about this fast-growing area of flood risk management and the amazing work that Slow the Flow is doing in the Calder Valley.

“The Calderdale Flood Action Plan recognises the many benefits of using natural flood management alongside other methods such as engineered flood defences and we are excited to see Slow the Flow pioneering the use of data to develop NFM knowledge and improve understanding of its impacts.”

Places are free thanks to the grant from the Community Foundation for Calderdale but spaces are limited.

For more information on Slow The Flow Calderdale, visit www.slowtheflow.net or call Adrian Horton on 07557 954113.